Index - here




All newspaper articles and advertisements are from Papers Past - National Library of New Zealand or 
Trove - National Library of Australia unless otherwise stated.


Photographer's negatives - the most common question I am asked relates to the current location of photographer's negatives - see this post. 

I'm not able to provide any information about photographers other than that on this site.  I'm am also not able to date photographs or assist you in identifying people in photographs you may have.  I am unable to assist in locating the current location of business records of any photographer.

I recommend the Auckland City Library's website for more information about New Zealand photographers -  http://www.aucklandcity.govt.nz/dbtw-wpd/photographers/basic_search.htm


Links - here



Stonebridge and Co.

Stonebridge and Co.
25 Vivian Street, Wellington





Kinsley & Co
Lambton Quay, Wellington, N.Z.




 

HEGINBOTHAM, Joseph Alfred






Joseph Alfred Heginbotham
Tea Gardens, Kilbirnie, Wellington

Family:
born 1860 son of Joseph Henry Heginbotham (warehouseman, later cooper) and Jane Pownall, reg. Sept quarter 1860 Chorlton, Lancashire vol. 8c page 564, baptised 7 October 1860 Newton-in-Mackerfield, Lancashire, England, arrived Wellington, New Zealand on the "Avalanche" 4 December 1875 as a Government immigrant aged about 15 years, died 18 November 1953 aged 93 years, reg. 1953/30694, ashes buried 21 November 1953 Karori Cemetery, section Church of England, plot number 84 T.

His parents married 25 December 1850 at the Holy Trinity Church, Manchester, his father Joseph Henry Heginbotham, then a warehouseman, was the son of John Heginbotham a farmer, his mother Jane Pownall was the daughter of James Pownall a husbandman. They arrived Wellington, New Zealand on the "Avalanche" 4 December 1875 as Government immigrants. Joseph Henry Heginbotham died 26 July 1905 at Kilbirnie, Wellington, New Zealand, his mother Jane Pownall died 14 February 1914 at Henry Street, Kilbirnie, Wellington. 

Other relatives in New Zealand included his aunt Martha Heginbotham (1818-1901) formerly Martha Ford, the widow of George Lomas Heginbotham (1815-1867), she died on 28 February 1901 at Kilbirnie, and her children Mary Norris (1841-1914), George Heginbotham (1845-1919) and William Heginbotham (1857-1905), an Architect in Wellington and Nelson.

He married 1stly 25 June 1882 at St Mark's Church, Wellington by the Rev. R Coffey, Mary McArthur, third daughter of George McArthur Esq., of Maldon, Victoria, died 18 January 1915 Bluff, buried 25 January 1915, buried Karori Cemetery, section Church of England, plot number  84 T.

He married 2ndly 14 December 1918 at St John's Church, Roslyn, Dunedin by the Ven. Archdeacon Fitchett, Irene May Wilkin, born 26 May 1885 daughter of Edith Leaf Green and John Winstanley Wilkin (Chief Postmaster at Dunedin), reg. 1885/13748, died 7 January 1961 Lower Hutt aged 75 years, reg. 1961/23746. 



issue with Mary McArthur: 
1. Ethel Heginbotham (twin) born 28 November 1883 Kilbirnie, Wellington (this birth appears not to have been registered), died 11 December 1883 aged "11 days", Kilbirnie, Wellington reg.  1883/5168 as Ethel Higginbotham, Church of England section, Bolton Street Cemetery, Wellington, plot unknown


2. Son (twin) stillborn 28 November 1883 Kilbirnie, Wellington (Evening Post, Volume XXVI, Issue 129, 29 November 1883)


3. Gladys Pownall Heginbotham born 2 December 1889 Rostherne/Rosthorn, Sussex Square, Kilbirnie, Wellington, reg. 1890/2228, died 21 August 1924 Wellington aged 32 years, buried 22 August 1924 Karori Cemetery, Church of England section, plot number 84 T, married 27 June 1923 All Saints Church, Kilbirnie, Wellington by the Rev. J. H. Sykes, reg. 1923/7843 Richard Simon Bender (cabinet maker) born 28 August 1881 Wellington, reg. 1881/7039, third son of Amelia and Captain Simon Bender, died 29 May 1968 aged 86 years, reg. 1968/33467, ashes buried Karori Cemetery, Church of England section, plot number 101 A, he married 2ndly 10 June 1936, reg. 1936/7245 Winifred Margaret Fredrico born 10 July 1909, reg. 1909/6573, daughter of Winifred Agnes Colgate and Fredrick Fredrico, died 26 June 1978, reg. 1978/34619, ashes buried Karori Cemetery, Church of England section, plot number 101 A. 


4. Iris Hermia Heginbotham born 6 May 1892, reg. 1892/6336, died 4 September 1961, Hastings, cremated at Hastings, married 6 June 1912 by the Registrar, W. Cook, Wellington, reg. 1912/2132  Eric William Brooke-Taylor son of Walter Brooke-Taylor and Annie Smart Loxley, born 22 September 1891 Wellington, died 8 July 1970 Hastings, cremated at Hastings.
    issue:
    4a. William Lovell Brooke-Taylor born 8 August 1912 Kilbirnie, Wellington, died 12 November 1918, aged 6 years, buried 13 November 1918, Karori Cemetery, Church of England section plot 24 E (as William Brook Taylor). 
     4b. Sybil Elsie Brooke-Taylor born 3 January 1914 Kilbirnie, Wellington, died 27 April 1999, registered 1999/9172, cremated at Hastings, married September 1933, Eugene Melnott Gill, born 10 August 1911, reg. 1911/24800, died 1995, reg. 1995/32422, second son of Sarah Irwin Jenkins and John Harley Gill of Rongotai. In 1970 she lived at 612A Frederick Street, Hastings.
issue:
          4bi son born 2 April 1936 St Helen's Hospital, Wellington


5. Marjorie Sibyl Heginbotham born 5 April 1893, reg. 1893/13315, married 24 March 1916 Kilbirnie Presbyterian Church, Kilbirnie, Wellington by the Rev. Begge, reg. 1916/4322 Ulisse Arturo Walter Robinson, jeweller, born 10 July or August 1894 Palmerston North only son of Walter and Amelia Robinson, died 30 July 1969 Dargaville
     issue:
     5a. Zita Odesa Robinson (Mrs Downie) born 30 October 1916 Wellington, reg. 1916/29139
     5b. June Robinson
     5c. Maldon Ulisse Robinson, born circa 1918, killed in action 31 March 1944 aged 26 years, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 50 (RAF) Squadron, buried Hanover War Cemetery, Hanover, Niedersachsen, Germany.


issue with Irene May Wilkin:
6. Marcus Heginbotham born 6 October 1919 Kilbirnie, Wellington, died 16 November 1999 Tauranga Hospital, aged 80 years, reg. 1999/25066, buried 19 November 1999 Opotiki Public Cemetery plot RSA 275 (1961 Storekeeper, Opotiki).


7. Denys Heginbotham born 11 November 1922, died 12 April 1998 aged 75 years, reg. 1998/6717 (1961 Doctor, Upper Hutt)


New Zealand
 Manager of the Cuba Street branch of the New Zealand Clothing Factory
1885, 1887.

A branch of the New Zealand Clothing Factory has just been opened in Cuba-street, in charge of Mr. J. A. Higginbotham (sic), who has been connected with the Lambton Quay branch for some years past. The new premises are roomy and neatly, fitted up, and are conveniently situated for residents in the Te Aro district...
Evening Post, Volume XXX, Issue 141, 11 December 1885

J. A. Heginbotham, draper, of Cuba street, and Te Aro House.
Evening Post, Volume XLI, Issue 114, 15 May 1891



 Tea Gardens and Hall, Kilbirnie
A novel and welcome addition to the natural attractions of Kilbirnie has been made in the opening there of tea gardens, to which there will be free admission, and where refreshments will be obtainable at moderate charges. The gardens are under the superintendence of Mrs. Heginbotham, senr., and are part of her property, which is beautifully situated on the rise near the hotel, commanding an unrivalled view of Evans Bay and the Straits. The greatest taste has been displayed in laying out the gardens, which are now looking splendid in their wealth of colouring from a variety of flowers and shrubs. A summer-house offers tempting rest and shade to visitors, while children will find, no doubt, endless amusement in the antics of the monkeys in a cage in the gardens. Kilbirnie will distinctly gain by this added attraction to its other charms.
Evening Post, Volume XLII, Issue 111, 6 November 1891

The tea gardens at Kilbirnie, which are to be opened to the public on Monday will agreeably surprise those who pay them a visit. Considerable taste has been displayed in laying out the grounds, and there are a number of shady nooks where visitors may rest themselves from the sun’s rays. There are also several summer houses, furnished with rustic chairs, and a monkey house, in which are a couple of monkeys, should provide amusement for children. The entrance to the gardens is gained by a road which branches off to the right from the main road just after passing through what is known as the cutting at the tap of the Kilbirnie hill. The view from the locality is both extensive and charming, and takes in part of Cook Strait, Lyells Bay, Pencarrow Head, and a large portion of Evans Bay. The Kilbirnie Gardens will be under the superintendence of Mrs Heginbotham, and the - proprietor intends making improvements from time to time until he has succeeded in forming the place into one of the prettiest resorts in the district. One of the principal features in connection with these gardens is that the public are admitted free of charge, being only required to pay for refreshments, such as tea or coffee, etc.
New Zealand Times, Volume LII, Issue 9445, 7 November 1891


A new hall has been recently erected at Kilbirnie for Mr J. A. Heginbotham of that suburb by Messrs Derby and Darlington. The hall is 60ft by 30ft, and has a stage 10ft deep. The formal opening of the hall took place last night, when a concert and dance were held, the proceeds of which were in aid of the Kilbirnie Cricket Club. There was a very large attendance, Mr H. D. Crawford, president of the club, presiding. In opening the proceedings Mr Crawford congratulated Mr Heginbotham on his enterprise in supplying a long felt want in Kilbirnie...
New Zealand Times, Volume LIII, Issue 9723, 1 October 1892


Monkeys, a northern contemporary remarks, do not, as a rule, breed in confinement, and one of the curiosities at Heginbotham's tea gardens, Kilbirnie, is a youngster just born to the pair of monkeys kept there by the proprietor. It is understood to be the first of its kind to see light in Wellington, if not in New Zealand, and it is stated that in seventeen years only one was born amongst the many simians kept in the Acclimatisation Society's Gardens at Sydney.
Star, Issue 5704, 24 October 1896 


Heginbotham's Tea Gardens, Kilbirnie, too, is a pleasant place to spend a happy day. Picnic parties can get refreshments at a moderate charge. The photographic studio will be open during the Christmas holidays as usual.
 Evening Post, Volume LVI, Issue 152, 24 December 1898


Evening Post, Volume LX, Issue 150, 22 December 1900



Wellington Camera Club

The Wellington Camera Club was formed in November 1892
Wellington Camera Club - Secretary
Evening Post, Volume LIV, Issue 98, 22 October 1897

Evening Post, Volume LIV, Issue 121, 18 November 1897

1898
Exhibited at the Wellington Camera Club, Annual Exhibition - October 1898.
Awards:
Landscapes
"Stormy Twilight” by J. A. Heginbotham, first
“Behind the Windy Town" by J. A. Heginbotham, very highly commended

Seascapes
“On the Sands,” by J. A. Heginbotham, very highly commended

Carbon and Kindred Processes
"Declining Day'" by, J. A Heginbotham, second

Platinotype
“Shades of Evening,” by J. A. Heginbotham, very highly commended
New Zealand Times, Volume LXVIII, Issue 3561, 13 October 1898


The Wellington Camera Club's exhibition at the Exchange Hall was opened last night by Mr. W. T. L. Travers ... [who] ... delivered an interesting address on photography. He laid special stress upon the advantages cf the platinotype and carbon processes, illustrating his remarks with references to the excellent results obtained by Messrs. J. A. Heginbotham and T. Pringle...
Evening Post, Volume LVI, Issue 91, 14 October 1898

Camera Club Exhibition
The Judge's Report
...The landscape class, for a club exhibition, is certainly of a high order, and Mr Heginbotham's picture - “A Stormy Twilight” - which is awarded first prize, would, I feel sure, take honours in a much more important exhibition. This I regard as the picture of the exhibition, and it shows how, with the exercise of a little artistic judgment, both the negative and the enlargement can be improved by mechanical means ... Mr Heginbotham’s picture I may remark that the composition is good, and that there is about it breadth and vigour of treatment that are both pleasing and effective. Mr Pringle’s second prize picture is somewhat weak in composition in one corner, and, though not what might be termed a “strong” composition, it is redeemed by its excellence of tone and atmosphere. It is quite a different type of picture to that which Mr Heginbotham has turned out; but it is a class of work equally worthy of encouragement. Indeed many artists will prefer it, and were this picture only a little stronger in composition, it might even have secured first prize...
New Zealand Times, Volume LXVIII, Issue 3563, 15 October 1898

October 1898 re-elected as secretary of the Wellington Camera Club
Evening Post, Volume LVI, Issue 97, 21 October 1898


1899
The Suter Art Gallery, Special Opening Exhibition - June 1899
...The club, next to the Nelson Club, contributing the largest number of exhibits is the Wellington Camera Club, and the secretary of the club, Mr Heginbotham, has not less than twenty photos exhibited. Most of these are carbon prints, and among the number of exquisite pictures he shows may be mentioned "On the Sands," "Behind the Windy Town," "The Rivers Ford," "End of an Autumn Day," and "Sibyl," the latter an enlarged portrait...
Colonist, Volume XLII, Issue 9497, 5 June 1899

Wellington Camera Club - intercolonial exhibition of photographs
There are over 600 pictures on view, including photographs from New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Queensland. in addition to the numerous pictures from other parts of New Zealand..

...The judges have awarded the honour of the best picture in the exhibition to “The Smithy,” by J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington.

Class A, landscapes.
“The Meadow Stream,” J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington, highly commended
“Solitude,” J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington, highly commended

Class D, genre.
First prize £2 2s, second £1 1s, third 10s 6d:
“The Smithy,” J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington first
“Toilers of the Field,” J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington, highly commended 
“At Play,” J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington, highly commended  
“On the bands, J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington, highly commended  

Class E, animals.
“Hesitation,” J.A. Heginbotham, Wellington, [highly commended?] 

...The genre class boasts possession of “the picture of the exhibition” in “The Smithy,” an interior by Mr Heginbotham (Kilbirnie). All photographers must share the enthusiasm with which the judges regarded this remarkably successful photograph...
New Zealand Times, Volume LXIX, Issue 3770, 19 June 1899

Photography as an Art
Some Comments on the Camera Club's Exhibition
...in genre studies, work of a very high class has been done by Mr. Heginbotham and others. Mr. Heginbotham's picture of The Smithy might very well be an engraving of a first-class painting. There is hardly a fault to find with it, and the judges were from the first decidedly of opinion that, everything considered, it is the most meritorious picture in the Exhibition.
Evening Post, Volume LVII, Issue 148, 24 June 1899

Mr Heginbotham has the best picture in the gallery, a wonderful interior of a smithy, with the smith at work.
Wairarapa Daily Times, Volume XVI, Issue 6272, 27 June 1899


Dunedin Photographic Society's Exhibition
Class I. Landscape.
4th J. A Heginbotham

Class IV.-Genre
4th J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington.

Class VI.— Portraits.—
1st J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington
4th J. A. Heginbotham, Wellington

The Best.- The judges have picked out No. 117, ‘The Smithy," by J. A. Heginbotham lington) as the best picture in the exhibition. The reason why this exhibit did not win in its class is that it is an enlargement.
Evening Star, Issue 10993, 25 July 1899


Evening Post, Volume LXI, Issue 135, 10 June 1901



Three unidentified women by Joseph Alfred Heginbotham



[Portrait of a woman], Wellington, by Joseph Heginbotham. 
Purchased 1999 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds. Te Papa (O.030298)




Alice, 1895-1900, Wellington, by Joseph Heginbotham. 
Purchased 1999 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds. Te Papa (O.022201)


 Farmyard scene, Wellington, by Joseph Heginbotham. 
Purchased 1999 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds. Te Papa (O.020396)




MOUNTFORT, Charles Wheeler



Charles Wheeler Mountfort
(born 19 December 1826 - died 19 April 1918)

Charles Wheeler Mountfort was born at Aston now part of Birmingham, England on 19 December 1826 the son of Thomas Mountfort and Susanna Woolfield. He was baptised with his sister Susanna Wale Mountfort on 2 January 1829 at Saint George, Birmingham. His brother was the architect, Benjamin Woolfield Mountfort.

He married Mary Eliza Adnam on 10 August 1850 and they arrived at Lyttelton, on 16 December 1850 on board the first of the Canterbury Association's ships, the Charlotte Jane. Initially they settled in Lyttelton before moving to Christchurch in
October 1851.

 


A Windmill is in course of erection on Mr. Mountfort's land, near Christchurch Quay, on the Ferry Road. The works are progressing as fast as the wet weather will permit, and it is expected that every thing will be completed by the middle of July. The Mill is capable of grinding, with a moderate breeze, 5 bushels per hour; amply sufficient to meet- the requirements of the Plains. A practical miller assures us that the Mill is a first-rate one, and supplied with everything needful for dressing flour, cleansing corn of smut, &c. Mr. Mountfort is the proprietor, and the public are indebted to him for making available property which for a considerable time has been lying useless in the Colony.
Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 128, 18 June 1853, Page 6


Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 136, 13 August 1853, Page 12

Three children were born in Christchurch, Mary Elizabeth Mountfort in 1852, Charles Adnam Mountfort in 9 February 1854 (Lyttelton Times) and Emily Kate Mountfort in 1856. Charles is shown as a civil engineer living in the Lower Heathcote District.

In November 1856 Charles Mountfort moved to Dunedin with his wife and three children following in February 1857. On 29 April 1858 Ernest Richard Mountfort the infant son of Charles Mountfort died in Dunedin. (Lyttelton Times) The family lived at one time at the Water of Leith in Dunedin. There is a report of furniture and household effects being sold by auction at the residence of Mr. Henry Argles "adjoining Mr Mountfort's house, at the Water of Leith. (Otago Witness , Issue 469, 24 November 1860, Page 4)

In 1862 he completed a survey on the route of the telegraph line from Dunedin to the Heads via Port Chalmers.
 

Otago Witness, Issue 528, 11 January 1862, Page 6
















Otago Daily Times, Issue 1498, 16 October 1866, Page 6


Otago Daily Times, Issue 1541, 5 December 1866, Page 3

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF NEW ZEALAND, OTAGO AND SOUTHLAND DISTRICT.
In the matter of the petition of Charles Wheeler Mountfort, late of Dunedin, in the Province of Otago, Surveyor, but now of Timaru, in the Province of Canterbury, Photographer, a debtor; and in the matter of the Debtors and Creditors Acts, 1862, 1865, and 1866.
Take notice, that Charles Wheeler Mountfort has presented and filed his petition for the sequestration of his estate, for the benefit of all his creditors, and for relief according to the provisions, of the Debtors and Creditors Acts; and that the said petition has been accepted by His Honor Mr Justice Chapman, who has appointed Monday, the eleventh day of November next, at ten of the clock in the forenoon, at the Supreme Court House, Dunedin, for the hearing of the said petition. HENRY HOWORTH, Solicitor for the insolvent. Dated at Dunedin, this twenty-seventh day of September, 1867.

Otago Daily Times, Issue 1793, 28 September 1867, Page 6

 

On 26 February 1867 he arrived in Timaru on the ship "Geelong" from Dunedin with his family.
Timaru Herald, Volume VI, Issue 187, 16 March 1867, Page 2

 

Photography - We observe that Mr Mountfort, of Dunedin, has taken the photographic studio lately in the occupation of Monsieur Cabot. Mr Mountfort has invited us to inspect the studio, which has been considerably improved, but still hardly fit for the work, and he intends shortly, we believe, to build larger premises. Our attention has been particularly directed to the process of taking likenesses and views by the instantaneous process which is adapted more especially for children and animals and for street views where life is in motion. The twentieth part of a second is the time occupied. We were shewn some views taken in the streets of Dunedin, which for clearness and fidelity we have rarely seen equalled. We observed one of Ross’ actinic doublet lens, constructed especially for landscape views, and for copying maps &c. We should think that Mr Mountfort’s establishment would be largely patronised, as his studio offers to the public many advantages which have not hitherto been within its reach.
Timaru Herald, Volume VI, Issue 188, 20 March 1867, Page 2


Timaru Herald, Volume VI, Issue 188, 20 March 1867, Page 3


Charles Mountfort continued to advertise in the Timaru Herald as a photographer, but at the end of August 1867 he was also advertising as a civil engineer and surveyor.



Timaru Herald, Volume VII, Issue 236, 31 August 1867, Page 1




North Otago Times, Volume IX, Issue 270, 24 December 1867, Page 3

On 7 December 1868 the shop and house occupied by Charles Mountfort on the east side of Main South Road was destroyed by fire, only the chimney remained standing afterwards. This was one of about 40 buildings destroyed in what was known as the "Great Fire" of Timaru. At that time one of the most disastrous fires to have occurred in New Zealand.
Timaru Herald, Volume IX, Issue 369, 9 December 1868, Page 2
In 1870 he was declared bankrupt 

 Star, Issue 793, 8 December 1870, Page 3.



Probate of the will of the late Mr. Thomas Robinson Woolfield, who was formerly in business in Liverpool, but about 50 years ago went to reside at Cannes, where he died on the 28th April last, in his 89th year, has been granted to the executor, his nephew, Mr Richard Peele Mossop, of Holbeach, Lincolnshire, solicitor. The testator devised and bequeathed all his property in England in trust for his wife, Mrs Catherine Woolfield (note 1), absolutely, but in the event of her decease in his lifetime, as to one-fifth of his residuary estate for the three daughters of his brother Charles; as to one-fifth for the children of his brother Samuel; as to one-fifth for his brother John Clowes; as to one-fifth for the daughter and two sons [Susanna Wale Luck nee Mountfort, Benjamin Woolfield Mountfort and Charles Wheeler Mountfort] of his sister Susannah Mountford (sic); and as to the remaining one-fifth for the three daughters of his sister Louisa Nicholls. By a will dated 26th November, 1884 the testator appointed his said wife the universal heir of his property in France, and his nephew, Mr. Leopold Hansbery, Mr. John Taylor, banker and his H.B.M's Vice--consol at Cahnes (sic), executors. The value of the personal estate in England is £4415.
Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Thursday, August 30, 1888; Issue 12680.

note 1. Catherine Mossop born 4 March 1801 Lincolnshire, died 28 April 1888 Cannes, Gard, Languedoc-Roussillon, France or in 1894 in England.


Golden Wedding.
The golden wedding of Mr and Mrs C. W. Mountfort, senr, was celebrated in Feilding yesterday. In the forenoon a special service was held in the Church of England by the Rev. Innes Jones.

It is interesting to note that Mr Mountfort, and the other members of his family, were active promoters of the Church in Feilding in the early days of the settlement. In the evening Mr and Mrs Mountfort entertained a large number of relations and friends (Feilding being the most central point for the various families to assemble) at the residence of their son, Mr Charles Adnam Mountfort.

The following is a brief account of the important share taken by Mr Mountfort in the work of colonisation in New Zealand in the early days of its history :—

Mr Mountfort was born at Aston, near Birmingham, on December 19th 1826. Went to London in 1843 to serve his time to the profession as a Civil Engineer and was articled to Cockburn Curtis, one of the Engineers under the Tidal Harbors Commission of the Admiralty, Captain Beaufort being the head of the department. After the expiry of his time in this class of engineering he served a time with Mr Alexander Gerdon [perhaps Alexander Gordon], the Engineer for the Colonial Lighthouses under the Admiralty. Mr Gerdon was also the London Engineer for the Steam Men-of-War built by Robert Napier, of Glasgow. Under Curtis he acquired a knowledge of Marine and Land Survey, and under Mr Gerdon a knowledge of lighthouse construction, marine architecture, and all branches of mechanical engineering.

In the year 1847 he traveled for a time on the Continent and was enabled to inspect many of the fine works of French engineering which at this time was in great advance over the English in connection with suspension bridges which were very abundant and very beautiful in design, particularly at Lyons, over the Rhone, and the Soane, which were capable of carrying very heavy traffic; whereas, in England, at that time, suspension bridges were confined to pedestrians.

He passed on into the South of France to Cannes, where he stayed on a visit with Mr T. Robinson Woolfieid (his uncle), who had a beautiful estate, and chateau opposite Lord Brougham's. It was during, we may say 1848 that the Revolution took place in which Louis Phillippe, the King, had to flee to England and a Republic was proclaimed. An incident occurred at Cannes at this time which created much comment by the English Press, viz., — Lord Brougham wrote a letter to the Mayor of Cannes asking to have his name enrolled as a citizen of France, and then immediately started for England. The Mayor, not under standing how to act under the circumstances, but knowing that Lord Brougham was a frequent visitor at the Chateau St. George, Mr Woolfield's place, took the letter to him and asked his advice, and was recommended by him to write to his Lordship and inform him that he (Lord Brougham) could not be a Citizen of France and a Peer of England at the same time.

In January 1848 Mr Mountfort went on to Nice and shortly after his arrival the Governor of Nice opened the season with a State ball, given in honor of Sir Charles Napier, the old Indian General, who, with a number of his staff, was on his way to England, Mr Mountfort had the honor to be present at this ball. He stayed at Nice for about a month to participate in the pleasure of the season, which was a very brilliant one, as a great number of the English nobility spent the season at Nice in the year 48, and as, during the same year, the whole Continent was in a state of Revolution, a great many political refugees sheltered at Nice, it being neutral ground.

From Nice he travelled on along the shores of the Mediterranean, visiting those places which have now become such fashionable resorts, but in those days were only noted for their beautiful scenery and quaint old towns, and to which the picturesque bright colored dresses of the peasantry added a peculiar charm.

In course of time he reached Genoa, the city of palaces, where be stayed a few weeks, intending to go to Rome, but again revolution broke out and as it was not longer safe for foreigners to remain, he, with numerous English travellers, made their way back, partly on mules, through the mountains into Sardinia, the neutral country.

As matters in France had settled down pretty quietly under the Republic, with Lamartine at the head he took steamer to Marseilles, from whence he travelled on to Paris, where he hoped to spend some weeks as he had not seen all he wished to on his first visit. The time had now reached June, 1848. It was a notable time in French history. He had been in Paris about two or three weeks when a terrible revolution took place, instigated by the party called Red Republicans. Barriers were thrown up in all directions; cannon were roaring night and day, and a fearful scene of bloodshed took place. The old Archbishop of Paris, accompanied by his priests, went in procession to one of the main barriers in hopes of appeasing the people; but it was useless. He was shot down at once finding that it would be a considerable time before anything more could be seen in Paris, through the influence of friends he had made, he obtained his passport and was enabled to leave Paris for Boulogne and there took the first steamer for England, which he reached the same day that the Chartists riots were suppressed. A vast number of special constables had been sworn in for the occasion, one amongst them being Louis Napoleon, afterwards Emperor of France.

He was engaged for more than 12 months in engineering work, when everything relating to the profession came to a standstill. His brother, who was an architect, with himself, thought they could not do better than emigrate and just at that time the Canterbury scheme was brought before the public. After carefully considering the scheme they joined it.

Soon after his return from the continent be made the acquaintance of his wife's family, in London, which after a time became something more than acquaintance, and his wife then Miss Mary Adnam, the youngest daughter, fully entered into the scheme for colonisation. He immediately became, as required by the scheme, a land purchaser in the Canterbury Association, and also purchased everything necessary for starting in a new colony, in which he found his promised bride a very valuable assistant. When all this was arranged they were married on August 10th 1850.

On the 1st September, Mr Mountfort and his wife sailed from London in the Charlotte Jane, for Plymouth, when all the first four ships carrying he first body of colonists were to start the same day, September 7th, for New Zealand. The ship on which Mr Mountfort was entered Port Lyttelton at 11 a.m on the 16 December, 1850. The Randolph came in at 4 p.m. the same day, the Sir George Seymour came into port at 8 a.m. on the 17th, and the Cressy, a barque, three weeks afterwards.

Upon landing, the majority of the colonists pitched their tents and lived in them until such time as they could get their first houses in Lyttelton erected. In the October of 1851 he left his house and land in Lyttelton and went over on to his rural land on the plains, about 2 miles from Christchurch, where he had a house built ready for his use. There not being anything in those early days requiring professional men they cultivated their land by hand labor as the servants they brought out knew no more about such work than themselves.

In the year 1856 Mr J. T. Thomson (afterwards Surveyor-General) who was on the Indian Survey for many years, was appointed Chief Surveyor of Otago wrote to the Chief Surveyor of Canterbury asking if he could find any competent surveyors who would take service on the Otago survey. Mr Mountfort handed his testimonials to the Chief Surveyor of Canterbury, who advised I him to go as soon as possible, and gave him a letter to Mr Thompson. In about a fortnight a small coasting schooner, the Ocean Queen (about 30 tons) sailed for Otago, and in this he went, reaching Otago in eleven days (note 1), Mrs Mountfort and family followed him to Otago in a small schooner and arrived the last day of February, 1857, the passage occupying ten days. (note 2) When he arrived there then Mr Thompson was away in the interior, but the Government seeing Mr Mountfort's testimonial and letter from the Chief Surveyor of Canterbury, appointed him at once. Mr Thompson returned about a month after this.

He remained in the Otago service with Mr Thomson for 12 years, from whom he received a high testimonial upon his leaving to return to the Canterbury province. Mr Mountfort's eldest son, Mr C. A. Mountfort, who had chosen the profession of surveyor, and had passed his examination, came up to the North Island, and was appointed one of the surveyors of the Manchester Block in 1871. Mr Mountfort followed his son in 1875 to survey on the same block. For the past fifteen years Mr Mountfort has resided in Napier, having relinquished professional pursuits.

Feilding Star, Volume XXII, Issue 36, 11 August 1900, Page 2


note 1. - The schooner "Ocean Queen" of 20 tons arrived in Lyttelton from Sydney via Nelson on 26 October 1856, she departed Lyttelton of Otago on 4 November 1856, however Charles Mountfort's name is not shown among the 10 passengers who departed Lyttelton. No passenger's names are shown in the Otago Witness newspaper on the vessels arrival in Dunedin or Port Chalmers on 11 November 1856.
The Lyttelton Times, 5 November 1856, page 6

Otago Witness, Issue 259, 15 November 1856, Page 3

note 2. -
Mrs Mountfort, three children, Mr Adnam and J. Mills sailed form Lyttelton on the schooner Eclair of 30 tons on 18 February 1857 and arrived on 27 February 1857. Otago Witness, Issue 274, 28 February 1857, Page 2


Obituary
The death of Mrs C. W. Mountfort occurred at her residence, Napier, on Tuesday morning. The deceased lady was born at Islington, (London) on July 19th, 1829, and had thus entered her 77th year. She was the daughter of Benjamin Adnam, who came from an old Berkshire family, and niece of Alderman Hooper [John Kinnersley Hooper], sometime Lord Mayor of London. She married, on August 5th, 1850, ; Charles Wheeler Mountfort, civil engineer, who had, previous to his marriage, been employed in the Admiralty, but his attachment to the Anglican Church induced him to join the Canterbury Association and buy under them before he left London a selection in Canterbury.

The young couple sailed in the Charlotte Jane, the first of the four ships to arrive in Lyttelton with the Canterbury Pilgrims. In 1856 Mr Mountfort leased his farm, and accepted a professional engagement under the Provincial Government of Otago, returning in 1868 to Canterbury, where he and his family remained till 1875, when they removed to the North Island.

In 1884 Mr Mountfort retired from actual professional work, and settled in Napier, where the family have resided ever since. Mrs Mountfort was identified with religious and charitable movements, and, in Association with the Napier Cathedral, held various positions under the late Dean Hovell in his parish work.

The deceased lady leaves to mourn her death her husband and four sons — Messrs C. A. Mountfort, surveyor, of Feilding; A. J. Mountfort, surveyor, of Kawhia; E. P. Mountfort, manager Bank of New South Wales, Stratford; and H. B. Mountfort, of the firm of Lees and Mountfort, of Wairoa and three daughters, Mrs Metford Taylor, widow of the late Geo. Metford Taylor; Mrs W. B. Retemeyer, of Dannevirke, and Miss Mountfort.— H.B. Herald.

Feilding Star, Volume XXVII, Issue 175, 22 February 1906, Page 2





Death of an Old Colonist.
News was received this morning by Mr. E. P. Mountfort of the death of his father, Mr. C. W. Mountfort, which occurred at Napier East this morning. The late Mr. Mountfort had a long and most interesting career, in the course of which he was at one time resident in Gisborne, having resided here from 1878 to 1884, being then a member of the staff of the Lands and Survey Department. In the latter year he retired and settled in Napier, where he has lived ever since.

His death marks the departure of the last of the Canterbury Pilgrims, he having been the sole surviving member of the passengers by the Charlotte Jane, the first ship to ring colonists to Canterbury.

The deceased gentleman possessed a remarkably robust constitution and during the course of the past 55 years had never once had to take to his bed through illness. He retired to rest last evening in his usual good spirits, and peacefully passed away shortly before 3 o'clock this morning.

Mr. Mountfort was born at Ashton, near Birmingham, in 1826; he went to London in 1843 to serve his time as a civil engineer, and was articled to Cockburn Curtis, one of the engineers under the Tidal Harbors Commission of the Admiralty. He subsequently served with Mr. Alexander Gordon, the engineer for colonial lighthouses under the Admiralty, and for steam men-o'-war built by Robert Napier, of Glasgow. Under Mr. Curtis he acquired a knowledge of marine and land survey and under Mr. Gordon a knowledge of lighthouse construction marine architecture and all branches of mechanical engineering.

In 1847 he travelled for a time on the Continent, and was enabled to inspect many of the fine works of French engineering, which at this time was in great advance over the English in connection with suspension bridges, which were very abundant and beautiful in design, particularly at Lyons, over the Rhone, and the Soane, which were capable of carrying very heavy traffic. He passed on into the South of France, where he stayed on a visit, with Mr. T. Robinson Woolfield, who had a beautiful estate and chateau opposite Lord Brougham's.

It was during 1848 that the revolution took place, in which Louis Philippe the King, had to flee to England and a republic was proclaimed. An incident occurred at Cannes at this time which created much comment in the English press. Lord Brougham wrote a letter to the Mayor of Cannes, asking him to have his name enrolled as a citizen of France, and then immediately started for England. The Mayor, not understanding how to act, but knowing that Lord Brougham was a frequent visitor at the Chateau St. George, Mr. Woolfield's place, took the letter to him and asked his advice, and was recommended to write to his Lordship and inform him that he (Lord Brougham) could not be a citizen of France and a peer of England at the same time.

In 1848 Mr. Mountfort went on to Nice and attended a ball given by the Governor in honor pf Sir Charles Napier, the old Indian general, who was on his way to England. He stayed at Nice for a month to participate in the pleasure of the season, which, was a very brilliant one as a great number of the English nobility spent the season at Nice in 1848, and as during the same year the whole continent was in a state of revolution a great many political refugees sheltered at Nice, it being neutral ground.

From there he travelled along the beautiful shores of the Mediterranean, and in course of time reached Genoa, the city of palaces, where he stayed a few weeks, intending to go to Rome, but again revolution broke out, and as it was no longer safe for foreigners to remain he, with numerous English travellers, made their way back, partly on mules, through the mountains, into Sardinia, the neutral country.

As matters had settled down in France pretty quietly under the republic, with La Martine at the head, he proceeded to Paris in June, 1848. It was a notable time in French history. He had been in Paris, about two or three weeks when a terrible revolution took place, instigated by the party called Red Republicans. Barriers were thrown up in all directions; cannon were roaring night and day, and a fearful amount of bloodshed took place. The old Archbishop of Paris, accompanied by his priests, went in procession to one of the main barriers in hopes of appeasing the people, but was shot down at once.

Mr. Mountfort shortly after obtained a passport and left for England, which he reached the same day that the Chartist riots were suppressed. A vast number of special constables had been sworn in, one amongst them being Louis Napoleon, afterwards Emperor of France.

He was engaged for more than 12 months in engineering work, when everything relating to his profession came to a standstill. His brother, who was an architect, with himself thought that they could not- do better than emigrate, and just at that time the Canterbury scheme was brought before the public. After carefully considering, the scheme they joined it, their attachment to the Anglican Church inducing them to do so. Meantime Mr. Mountfort had married Miss Adnam, who came from an old Berkshire family, and a niece of Alderman Hooper, sometime Lord Mayor of London. His wife fully entered into the scheme for colonisation.

On September 1st, 1850, Mr. and Mrs. Mountfort sailed from London in the Charlotte Jane for Plymouth, where all the four ships carrying the first body of colonists were to rendezvous, and all four started from Plymouth on September 7. The Queen Charlotte arrived at Lyttelton at 11 a.m. on December 16, 1850, the Randolph at 4 p.m the same day, the Sir George Seymour on the 17th, and the Cressy three weeks afterwards. Upon landing a majority of the colonists pitched their tents and lived in them until they could get houses erected. In October, 1851, Mr. Mountfort left his house in Lyttelton and went over on to his rural land on the plains, about two miles from Christchurch, where he had a house built ready for his use. There not being anything in those days requiring professional men, they cultivated their land by hand labor as the servants they brought out knew no more about such work than themselves.

In 1856 Mr. Mountfort accepted an appointment under Mr. J. T. Thompson, chief surveyor of Otago, going in a small schooner of 30 tons, the Ocean Queen, his family following later in another small vessel, the passage occupying ten days. He remained in the Otago service for about 12 years, receiving a high testimonial on his return to the Canterbury province.

He remained in Canterbury till 1875, when he removed to the North Island, doing much valuable work in the development of the Manawatu. In 1884 he retired from professional work and took up his residence in Napier.

His wife predeceased him in 1906. The following family is left to mourn the loss of a good father a sterling colonist, and a fine old English gentleman: Messrs. C. A. Mountfort. surveyor, of Feilding ; A. J. Mountfort, surveyor, of Kawhia; E. P. Mountfort, manager Bank of New Zealand, Gisborne; and H. P. Mountfort. of the firm of Lees and Mountfort, Wairoa; and three daughters, Mrs. Mitford-Taylor, Mrs. W. B. Retemeyer, and Miss Mountfort, of Napier.

Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLV, Issue 14583, 19 April 1918, Page 4


Children of Charles Wheeler Mountfort and Mary Eliza Adnam
Mary Elizabeth Mountfort born 4 January 1852 bapt 14 March 1852 (Engineer in the Heathcote District)
Charles Adnam Mountfort born 9 February 1854 bapt 2 April 1854 (Civil Engineer - Christchurch District)
Emily Kate Mountfort born 28 August 1856 bapt 30 November 1856 (Civil Engineer - Lower Heathcote District)

Herbert Benjamin Mountfort born 4 January 1872, bapt 10 March 1872 (Surveyor - St Saviour's District)